Books of the year – all of them

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I’m doing it slightly differently this year. This is in no way a lazy cop-out because I can’t face choosing the best ones. But I went to all the effort this year of writing down every single (non-work) book I read, and so I thought I might as well write them all down here, along with some brief notes and hints about which would have been my books of the year, had I done them properly. This means more recommendations, which is always a good thing, and it relieves some of the pressure of having to pick favourites.

To be clear, this list does not include: books I’ve edited, published, or that Bookouture have published, or that I read on submission. That’s quite a lot of books, but here is the list of all the others:

The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon – Brad Stone. The story of how Amazon went from being one guy with a good idea to the people who now deliver twelve items a day to my house.

Homecoming – Susie Steiner. Author of the more famous Manon Bradshaw thrillers. I loved this novel about a farming family.

Hillbilly Elegy – J. D. Vance. I feel like I should have a controversial view about what this says about Trump’s America. I don’t, but I liked it a lot.

The Girl Before – J. P. Delaney. First one to get a special award. There were several thousand massively hyped domestic psychological thrillers published in January/February 2017. This was, in my opinion, the best, and coincidentally (or not) it was also the most successful. So this wins my ‘best psychological thriller of early 2017’ award.

Silent Child – Sarah A. Denzil. Hugely gripping and hugely successful ebook bestseller. Kept one of my authors off the number 1 Kindle spot for several weeks so I wanted to hate it, but didn’t. Minor quibble: I guessed the ending early on.

Into the Water – Paula Hawkins. You all know what this one is or where have you been?

My Not-So-Perfect Life – Sophie Kinsella. This is Kinsella on top form. Properly hilarious, particularly on the topic of urban people going to the country, which is what I was/where I was when I read it.

The Fact of a Body – Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich. As the subtitle says, this is both a ‘true crime story’ of a murder and a memoir of the author’s family life. My one criticism was that the two strands didn’t fuse together/connect in a clear enough way for me, but each one separately was fascinating.

City of Friends – Joanna Trollope. Embarrassing admission that this was the first JT I ever read. I knew this was ridiculous beforehand, and reading it confirmed how ridiculous it was. Very much liked the book.

How Google Works – Eric Schmidt. What it sounds like – an interesting and inspirational book about how Google works. (The company, that is, not the actual search engine.)

Option B – Sheryl Sandberg. Have written about this one in detail here.

Daughters-in-Law – Joanna Trollope. See above – second Joanna Trollope I read!

The Night Visitor – Lucy Atkins. Brilliantly creepy thriller about female friendship, careers, jealousy and beetles.

A Thousand Splendid Suns – Khaled Hosseini. Honestly, this was my book of the year. You could argue that I’ve done this whole ‘listing all the books’ exercise to disguise the fact that my book of the year, shamefully, is a book that literally everyone else read nearly a decade ago. And you wouldn’t be entirely wrong. This is my perfect ‘type’ of book, and it is pretty close to being a perfect book. I didn’t read it for years because I was underwhelmed by The Kite Runner, but this was far better.

Then She Was Gone – Lisa Jewell. I always drop everything for the new Lisa Jewell, and this is a very good one. Both a gripping thriller and a heartbreaking family drama.

Since We Fell – Dennis Lehane. My first Dennis Lehane. An unusual book and tricky to pitch in a line. Loved the first half, didn’t think the second half worked, but still found it gripping and engaging.

The Seven Days of Us – Francesca Hornak. This is the book you want to read this week, as it’s all about being trapped in a house with difficult family members over the festive season. Great fun and also set in North Norfolk – always a plus.

His Bloody Project – Graeme MacRae Burnet. I was seriously put off reading this book for a long time by the title, which tries as hard as it can to sound like something I don’t want to read. But I loved it. So let that be a lesson to you, publishers. Make your book sound like something that doesn’t turn off the people who will want to read it.

Together – Julie Cohen. This one gets a special mention. Would probably make my ‘of the year’ list if I was doing a proper one. It has a mega twist that you either feel works, or ruins the whole thing, but I thought it *just* pulled it off.

The Party – Elizabeth Day. Very much liked this, but liked it less than Day’s Paradise City, which I read later on in the year. See below.

The Couple Next Door – Shari Lapena. Read this on my summer hols. Incredibly gripping but flawed. Undoubtedly the book of my summer holiday house however. Another person in our holiday party read it too and there were two copies already in the holiday villa. That’s how you know you’ve made it big.

Mrs Fletcher – Tom Perrotta. Not his best, but even not his best is better than most other people’s best. He is ace.

Persons Unknown – Susie Steiner. Manon number 2. Love her, and loved this.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine – Gail Honeyman. I had the same view on this as I had on Tin Man below. I liked both of them a lot, but I still liked them a bit less than most other people you’ve spoken to.

Tin Man – Sarah Winman. See above! As an editor I often read books and think they’re too long and need cutting. I thought this book was too short and needed lengthening. There was so much in it that was excellent and moving – but it felt to me like there wasn’t quite enough of it.

The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock – Imogen Hermes Gowar. This will undoubtedly be one of the big books of 2018. It was an incredibly impressive debut and *almost* brilliant. It gets a few points unfairly deducted because I wanted it to be The Crimson Petal and the White and it wasn’t. But still a good read.

Where Love Lies – Julie Cohen. Second Julie Cohen, following my enthusiasm for Together. Liked this one too, but not as much.

Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Another book I read loads of years after everyone else. I was scared that it wouldn’t be as good as Half of a Yellow Sun and it wasn’t, but it was still very good.

This is Going to Hurt – Adam Kay. Nothing to add to what the world has said on this. Hilarious, important etc. Very glad I read it after I was done having kids.

Paradise City – Elizabeth Day. See above. This is the sort of book I love, and I preferred it to The Party. London lives, intersecting characters you really care about. Humane and believable. That sort of thing!

The Power – Naomi Alderman. Again, you all know what this is. A clever idea indeed and the exciting thing about this one is that after 40 years of life, and almost as many years of being a reader, I finally this year became part of a book club and in it we read this. It is also notable for being sort-of science fiction, and yet I read it anyway. An unusual event.

I Am, I Am, I Am – Maggie O’Farrell. I always love Maggie O’Farrell and some of these were extremely moving and/or frightening – the very first chapter was the one that has most stayed in my mind.

Black Widow – Chris Brookmyre*Award klaxon*. This is without a doubt the best thriller I read this year. If you know me, I have most likely either recommended it to you or bought it for you already. If you don’t, then I have now.

Need to Know – Karen Cleveland. Out next year, and much hyped. This is psychological suspense meets espionage thriller. i.e. ‘What if you can’t trust your husband… and he’s also a spy?’ You never know – it could be the case.

Surprise Me – Sophie Kinsella. This is next year’s Kinsella. Not quite as good as this year’s, in my view, but I still tore through it.

Pachinko – Min Jin LeeFinal award winner. It gets a special mention not only for being very good but also because, when a friend recommended it to me, I hadn’t heard of it. This happens so rarely (that someone recommends a book I’ve literally never heard of at all) that I read it out of curiosity. But, as luck would have it, it is an outstanding novel about a Korean family living in Japan during the twentieth century. Highly recommended.

Force of Nature – Jane Harper. Second thriller by the author of The Dry which I liked just as much. It combines many of my interests in one place – it is a thriller which is also about workplace politics and also about why going camping is a terrible idea. Or going on any sort of trip where people take your phone away from you and/or you can’t get a decent phone signal. Don’t say you weren’t warned.

And my final – as yet unfinished – book of 2017 is Close to Home by Cara HunterRecommended to me by someone whose recommendations are almost always correct, and now also selected by Richard and Judy.

So it’s been a very good year. But, looking back to my last year’s resolutions, I still haven’t read The Goldfinch. One for next year…

 

 

 

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